Regarding Our Mother
(2017 sacrament-meeting svithe)


Like the previous svithe, one purposed of this post is to keep track of historical information. In this case, Mother's Day sacrament meetings I've organized.

In my intro I used a poem from an upcoming book.

The first talk was on why Jesus compared himself to a mother hen.

His wife spoke on how the Earth is shown as our mother in scripture.

The final speaker spoke on the topic: "I have a Heavenly Mother. So what?" She was the third terrific talk in a row---all three were thoughtful and carefully researched.

In between the final two talks, this hymn was sung. A clear tenor sung the lines, followed in echo by two men and women in harmony. It was a simple variation on the hymn as published, which made it easier to hear and understand the words. I didn't know when I requested the number if the music was any good, but it was beautiful as performed. If you want more info, this is the fellow who made it happen.

Between the first two talks, Primary stepped up to sing as well.


Here are a couple highlights I wrote down during the meeting. (There were many more than this, but I was paying too close attention to write much down.)

He drew on his experience studying story as a filmmaker to talk about some latin term I apparently forgot to write down and yonic symbols ad such. I should ask him for a copy of his talk. Having taken so long to write this up, I've lost the thread, alas.

"If we are striving to be like Christ, we must all strive to be like mother hens."

Like Jesus, we owe our mother's an unpayable debt.

This song (which made the fellow who did the special musical number nod in enthusiasm):

She began by talking about this article and her own mother when she was younger. Then on to how often, including in scriptures, women are so generally defined in terms of their relationships to other people. hcich prevents us from seeing them as themselves.

Mother Earth too experiences spirit, joy, pain.

Plus a quotation from Alexander Morrison, but I can't find it for you.

A song about Emma Smith (I'll add the link here when I find out what it was: link)

And... that seems to be all I wrote down about this one except for "potential" and "unconditional love." Which is a shame. It was some talk.

previous svithe

1 comment: